About your Search

20121027
20121104
SHOW
Book TV 23
Today 15
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 166
SFGTV 129
CNNW 83
MSNBC 77
MSNBCW 77
CNN 68
CSPAN 67
CSPAN2 61
WRC (NBC) 53
FOXNEWS 52
WTTG 41
CNBC 37
KPIX (CBS) 36
WJLA (ABC) 36
KQED (PBS) 31
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1360
Search Results 81 to 180 of about 1,372 (some duplicates have been removed)
of anyone. i have many years and seven years as an educators and taught there and president of board of ethics and board of appeals and 25 years of experience in doing service to the neighborhood. i am supported by the incumbent and scott wiener and others and i want very bad to be your supervisor and i am asking for your support and there's give me your vote on november 6. thank you. >> hi. i am joel io and i am running for supervisor and they have a way of looking at the happy meals but can't fill pot holes. where is the common sense? and many paid twice to fill the pot holes and where is the accountability of our money? so if you're tired of your house being the city's atm, if you're tired of the same politics and same choices i offer you an independent choice. i promise to be your advocate and work for you and not for the special interests and the super pacs that pass the other candidates and it's important in the junk mail and look at the fine print and see who is really spending on who and who is beholden to who. i worked as a journalist for years and i will bring that c
an education series last year called "too important to fail." i did a prime-time special last year. i am working on one now. this one is called "education under arrest." it is the -- about the criminalization of our kids in education, and where we would have been sent to the principal's office years ago, now you literally get a criminal record. you are standing in front of a judge for a fight in school, an argument with the teacher. the basic stuff that we used to get in trouble for and go to the office or go sit in study hall for a couple of hours, these kids are getting records, under this zero tolerance policy. i have been talking to a lot of kids in filming the special who are in alternative schools. the kids i have been talking to cannot cut it in the schools they are in, the traditional schools, or they want something different or they did put in a different school by a court, in an alternative program. i read that at one point in your life, not because you were in trouble -- at one point in your life, there was a decision by made by your parents or somebody to put you in an altern
challenges of the week. i'm honored to be here, your appreciation for the penn state and higher education. we need your continued engagement. again, thank you for joining us. thank you for bringing along the penn state cookies. [laughter] according to google news, there's over 45,000 stories about penn state and sandusky. you've written them. you've read them. i imagine that most of you have formed an opinion about penn state and our actions over the last year. beyond the headlines, there's another reality, one that exists for penn state's 96,000 students, 44,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, and over 550,000 living alumni. it's a world of teaching, research, and service. it's a world with an $800 million research program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, a law school, and 157 years of tradition. it's also a world that has continued to face ongoing controversies surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators, and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidence by the attorney generals fur
education in missouri? especially given the educational choices you have made for your own children. i am referring to your decision to home school your children and senator mccaskill's to send at least one of her children to private catholic schools. >> thank you for that question. all of us understand that education is critical. one of the things we have in america is something called the freedom. people can choose to educate the way that they want. we need to preserve that freedom. one of the things i have done that not another congressman in missouri has done is to vote no on no children left behind. i do not have abiding faith in the government to fix problems in education. even though it was my president who offer the bill, i told them no. i do not think all of the red tape in washington, d.c. helps our schools. i was willing to stand on the basis of principle the education needs to be local. what makes the best education is when you have a mom and dad that loves their kid and puts a high priority on education. with that kind of formula, education can work well for people. i support
. the government screwed it up. and they are getting hit it is a syllabus for disaster for educating our kids. >> wayne, 100 percent jump in the last 10 years, that is pretty big. in michigan state. he said you know, the students don't like the old style dorms where they share bathrooms. well enough. it is a prive privilege to get an education and you can't just abuse it. and so the fact they build new dorms and a lot of that is rushish. put it in the classroom and teachers and students where it will have an affect in the end and so that you see it in grades. >> sally do you support the fact that you keep giving. >> we are not. federal money goes to research grants and stuff like that. not for operating costings. but the states are what fund state universities have cut their spendog state universities 15 percent and enrollment went up 12 percent . meanwhile public universities are $5000 cheeper than private. this is a mountain out of a hole hill. >> wayne, that is happening out in california. >> it is happening everywhere. i say i think sally is right in that sense. you have to put the money
. the students who come from afar to receivan education here in san francisco and bring theater to life in the community. the thing is that this passion and dedication is much too big for simply 30 grant and deserves to be expanded father which is why we are excited and determined to bring this life to the strand in this area. along abandoned movie and vaudeville theater, dark and dilapidated and a community in need to serve it. by creating this theater we are confident we can provide art, diversity, education, and most importantly a new home for connecting act's community with the diverse bay area community and beyond. the strand is an opportunity to do all these things and we can have diversity throughout. >> thank you. >> come on up. let me read a couple more names. (calling speakers). >> okay. good afternoon. my name is tiand i am a third year student in act's for acting. i joined this because it's one of the top in the nation and it's commitment to company. this idea of building a community of artists that support each other. it ren enriches us and showns through in the w
coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go out shopping, take the materials that, and get to work. it is kind of like a reprieve, so they can really focus on their body of work. >> when you are talking about recology, do you have the only sculpture garden at the top? >> it is based on wo
was the ad wassreleased online by educating maryland kiis... a coaltionnworkkng ii support of ruuning a million dollar tv baltimore and d.c. iry..po erssandopponents of the dream pbforeelection day.quession h -3 four...would alloo illegal iimigrants to pay in-state &ptuitionaatmaryland collegess from a yland high schooll..andcomplete wars &pparents...would aaso haae to have paiddstate taxes for tte "what you're doing is youure pnvested anything ii the o community annopportunity to have the same benefit i disagree wwth thht." "someone ge an education,, they learn methg anlpn no if you still act. &phave questions regardinggthee maryyand effrendumss.. fox45 get in-depth 2 special nd explanations of the dream act referendum... the same-sex referendum tooexpand gambling that's mmndayynighh at 11... right here onnfox45. but there are still some power outages around the state. on thh situation.there..-pdaae - &p3 3 3 3 &p"i was truly blesd tths pime.............and he blessed me ttis time." 33:24 when urricann sandy swept old tree at druid hill park. park.theetree was uprooted by stron
a little bit about that. >> yes, we intend to conduct customer notification and education program. components that we talked about previously were very targeted toward the statutorily required opt out. now we're factoring in a preenrollment phase ahead of that opt out. that's the approach we think we're going to be recommending and how to ensure that communication and education that goes with that plan is as responsive and as complete and deep as it needs to be to make sure that we don't have any accidental customers. >> commissioner pimentel. >> what type of outreach strategies do you have to educate the community members about cleanpower sf and how will you go about implement them? will there be community meetings or mailers? >> it's a all of the above approach at this point. as i said we just got our customer education and notification consultant on board -- authority really -- not even on board yet, authority to get them on board, so it's of course developing, but yes we see working with community based organizations, using community meetings. i would say that prior to our
sector establishing and maintaining a eight-year partnership with the san francisco giants to educate, and to prevent pertussis from killing children in san francisco. i have a master's degree in economics and i am a music performer and so i am creative. i believe that the supervisor needs to be creative and think outside of the box to solve the issues that face district five in our city. i will work to make san francisco truly a transit city. a developed country is not one where poor people have cars, it is where rich people take public transportation. muni needs to be a viable, efficient, safe and clean transit option for everybody in san francisco. i want to work to make that happen as supervisor. i also will do the simple things like fix the road and the sidewalks that are in disrepair in district five which limit the mobility of seniors and the disabled. as supervisor i will support small businesses. i will talk to small business people in district five, they say that are feeling squeezed by skyrocketing grants and red tape and competition for big box stores. i will represent at
to thank the board of supervisors and board of education for holding this meeting. it's important for high school students and it's important for youth to graduate from high school with resources and for qualifications for going to usc or ucs. also recognizing there are many youth out there who don't know where or how to find their way to resources even if they wanted to. and with this new a-g requirement, students are able to graduate with a guarantee that they will qualify for csus and ucs, but it's very alarming to see there are so many disputes who are off-track on graduating. and i would want my peers to have the support that they need. so if there were more resources, like how these resources were able to help me. we need to make sure that all students have the opportunity, resources and support that they need to graduate. and 2014 may seem far away, but it's these next two years and the support we may or may not get that will determine where our future will be. thank you for your time. >> thank you very much and we want to thank the members of youth commissioner for their tremendo
of that assessment an educational process of how do we ride bicycles here in san francisco? because it's kind of confusing. >> thank you. >> the next question is for miss breed, mr. davis and miss johnson. a recent civil grand jury report called the san francisco ethics commission essentially a sleeping watchdog. at the request of supervisor campos the city requested a comparison of ethics in san îg:]Ñand los angele identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city,
have lots of water. there is any number of issues, whether it is around energy or education. this strikes me as a way to get around the challenge of government is dysfunctional and compartmentalize. you have a lot here. it seems like this might be part of the solution. >> before i comment about that, i want to be sure that we do not forget those have been unemployed so long they are out of the workforce. real question will skill readiness. i do not want to forget them in the equation. it is music my ears to hear the definition of the problem and information. it is music to my ears to hear that. we have a piecemeal approach of a couple of initiatives. they're really attract well to analyze and a city that is depopulating. you're trying to talk about redefining wealth. i think of the outbidding the police cars with the cameras, everybody has done that i think. both of those were seeded with grant money. when the grant ran out, we have not been able to keep up. there needs to be that money, whether it be federal or state. there needs to be this institutional approach that redef
. third was this body mass of education. the education is good in some pockets of the region and that in some. how can we use smarter principles, raced to the top, whatever. but it's really focused on what are the problems. let's take our breath and move on to the others. >> so that they take care and also folks have questions. the microphones are here. what i take from this conversation i want to get your response on the advice is to think about the city is a network of players, some very large, like a henry ford medical come even some of the cultural institutions, some of the employers, et cetera. a network of players who can take their own responsibility, obviously in partnership with the government around certain sets of issues. and the michael's point about what is the right issue to tackle because in the southeast, there's no water. last time i checked, you got lots of water, the great lakes. not your problem. but there's obviously a number of issues, whether it's run energy, education, health. this strikes me as a way to get around the challenge of government is dysfun
sectors of the economy -- education, health care, energy -- that haven't really been disrupted that much in the last 25 years, what i think of as the first internet revolution, getting everybody to believe it was important, get connected, multiple devices, multiple networks, that's sort of been accomplished. the second revolution is how you use the mobility of the internet to transform other aspects of life. those are worthy, you know, great entrepreneurs across the country are supporting, and they are the industries that are going to drive, you know, the future. initially, it was sort of the agriculture revolution, kind of, you know, the midwest and then sort of the industrial revolution and then sort of the finance and media revolution, more recently the technology revolution, the next wave is where we need to be positioned as a nation, and we really need to recognize these entrepreneurs are in some ways american heroes, too, because they're the ones who are taking the risk of starting these companies that can change the world, but also make sure we have a robust, growing economy in wh
inside his head. it is not history. it is more entertaining than itg is educational.add to but it is one thing the genre to actual history. >> was your day job? >> i teach at george washington. university. >> we have been talking to thomas and here is his novel. watergate. sir, thank you for being with us here on booktv at the national book festival in. >> next, in 1995, professor irvine tran-nines discuss his book "neo-conservatism: the autobiogrpahy of an idea." selected essays of 1949 to 1995 with brian lamb. he talked at length about the development of his personal philosophy, which began with marxism in the 1940s. .. c-span: what does it mean? >> guest: what it means is that--it refers to a constellation of opinions and views that is not traditionally conservative but is conservative and is certainly not liberal. and since i and others who have been called neo-conservatives move from being liberals to being a kind of conservative, then neo-conservatism seemed like a pretty good term. c-span: i did some calculations on the 41 different essays you have in the book
legitimate and getting an education and making sure that your relationships, people were legitimately married. anything that pointed back words or made you illegitimate was not really something they wanted to talk about and have out there. it is too bad because it closed a lot of doors in our family and that is what you found in michele obama's family. very fortunate, you were able to help and truly open those doors for her family. >> at least with been -- within her family, there are those conversations happening. as i said americans, ordinary americans across the country are making these discoveries with dna testing so these conversations are happening around the country. when you talk about marriage and the importance of legitimacy, one of the other stories which talks about the variations of the american experience during slavery was the first lady's family had ancestors who were freed for decades before the civil war and one of the most interesting records i came across was a record which showed those members of her family who after the civil war went to the courthouse and lined up to ge
, and herman cain with the mission to educate the public on issues facing us today. john: that government doesn't always make life better? >> that government has to get out of the way, or this economy and this country's going down the tubes. john: the chicken ad, you know, people say it's ridiculous, this is low budget. it's silly. it's beneath the importance of politics, and, yet, on super tuesday -- >> one of the most viewed youtube videos out there, just like the smoking ad. john: got more hitshan all the other guys running their commercials. >> combined, yes. john: the girl who says "any questions" is the director's daughter. >> yes. john: this director works for other people in addition to the smoking man ad. one is a c congressial candidate running in california against nancy pelosi -- good luck to him -- immediate -- med ya was not giving him attention. >> strangling job creation, burying us under a mountain of debt. >> do you want 500 americans to lose their jobs? are you serious? >> i am. john dennis, and i approve this message. john: he's the candidate, but, really, zombies. argue the
's to educate our students more and to tie them to technology. >> reporter: of the 1.4 million people who use the state's new online voter registration system about half of them were younger voters. maureen naylor, ktvu news. >>> a college education without the tuition. >> it's like coming out west in the gold rush. there's this big area who are trying to get in and we have no idea where it's going to go. >> the new trend in education and why some students feel cheated. >> at 10:45, sending supplies to areas hit hard by sandy. the big mobilization effort at travis. [ female announcer ] safeway presents real big deals of the week. or how to get great prices on things you need. heading into the holidays you look for the best deals. that's why we give you real big club card deals each week. right now, get a super low price on tide, $10.99 for 100 ounces. 12 rolls of bounty are $11.99. that's a dollar a roll! and charmin is $11.99 for 30 rolls. real big deals this week and every week. only at safeway. ingredients for life. >>> get ahead with a college education for the cost of an internet connect
-centric for something in the future. to me, both of those reasons focus on this time of investing in education and development of future capabilities, tactics, techniques, and procedures. we have to invest in that going forward. >> could i do a short follow-up? what does that approach imply for the army civilians and contractors? do they become diminished? >> they might in terms of numbers, but it will still play a role. >> and how do you incorporate the planning of what those numbers need to be, particularly on the contractor side? >> you want to have the right balance. again, contractors provide us with its unique capabilities that we simply do not have. that is what they will focus on. we have department of army civilians that will provide continuity and consistency that we need. then you need our military members in order to provide us with experience, expertise, and frankly sometimes, just the validity of what we are trying to do based on their experiences. that is where and try to capture the right mix. right now, it is overbalanced toward contractors and civilians. i'm trying to rebalan
, the words of comprehensive immigration reform, the focus on innovative economy, reform of education the like, it's fine. it's the lack of application of those words the inability to square up the reforms with the h 1 b visas. >> one simple bill would boost entrepreneurship all over is. if any foreigner wants to come and start an american company. i'm talking about them bringing in their own money 20 hens and hundreds of thousands of dollars from their friends their families from back home. if after five years they employeeemployfive workers we'll give you a green card. >> gavin: why that has not provided a champion from the president himself. >> there have been several bills attempted to be passed, but they're just stalled in economies and they don't go anywhere. if the president wanted to repay silicon valley for giving him all the political donations and supporting him he basically would have told his supporters to get this bill passed. he hasn't done that. it's that simple. >> gavin: what is the argument against it? you said it doesn't take away from american jobs. is that the concern? th
underestimate the economic stability and giving a child a good education. if parents are working multiple jobs, it's hard to be a good parent, hard to be there for the parent/teacher conferences. inso far as this alleviates economic stress, i think it's great. >> is this the reason behind this, though? >> this is -- that's why it's a two-fold answer. the second part is, there's something that feels not quite right about having to incentivize good parenting. >> let me challenge that for a second. if at the end of the day -- and you're right, it's all about getting better education for kids, and if although it's horrible -- >> and crass -- >> but if this gets the job done as the ceo, i say do it. >> you may think there's an ick factor. >> if it gets the job done, i'm for it. >> and offering a buffet lunch will get a parent in to care about their child and their child's relationship with that school, then that's what you need to do. whatever's necessary. >> let's do our next topic, football dancing. i know star's a big football fan. >> exactly. >> the jacksonville jaguars are trying to -- >> jack
. they register under the tax code 501 c 4. the organizations that are primarily about educating people about issues or policy options and things like that but they're allowed to do some political activity. it can't be the main thing they're about. but they are permitted to be in politics. and now because ofthe decisions from 2010 that are so famous they can be more specific in the way they're involved. the things that define the elections are -- because they're mainly about enl indicating people have been able to do that -- educating people and not mainly about elections, they have been able to do that without disclosing the sources of the money that they've gotten. so tense or hundreds of millions of dollars being spent without us knowing where it actually came from. host: let's go to our democrats line. caller: what i would like to say about this money, i feel like this money is basically it's generations of money which a lot of elderly white people have built up over time when the system was discriminatory. now they have come out and decided to buy an election. this money is not taxed or
measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be reformed or elimin
] and the mental health board members. alisa landy is my appointment and she's been wonderful educating me so much about the need of our richmond district to create a healthier richmond. and i know that there is an acknowledgment of the death in the officemax parking lot a few years ago when i first started as supervisor. so, the issues are very real for me. in 1984 i was a receptionist for an exceptional multi-cultural, culturally competent agency we used to call it richmond nazi center, [speaker not understood]. my two honorees i asked to come up are alison chin and yuka [speaker not understood]. so, alison and yuka. i also wanted to just state -- yes, please come forward. (applause) >> i would also like to say that president chiu and others acknowledged that it takes a village to really support a healthier community, and i think they come out of, in many ways, the wellness center from washington high school in addition to rams and the community-based mental health services that rams represent. alison chin is a licensed marriage and family therapist with over 15 years of experience in community
is ridiculously over educated. she holds due masters degrees, one in special education from the university of san francisco, one in social work from san francisco state. she has been a licensed clinical social worker, active in our community, serving on many boards and committees including the nicos chinese health coalition, the asian pacific islander social work council, the head start program, the [speaker not understood] coalition, association for the chinese families of the disabled. she's the co-founder of the association for chinese families of the disabled, has been a co-coordinator of the san francisco chinatown technology disabilities project, and a strong advocate and partner with my office on how we as a city provide culturally competent and linguistickly [speaker not understood] to under served communities. she has so many awards, i'm beingv going to read them all. her most important role is she is the head director of the chinatown child development center, a children's mental health clinic of the san francisco department of public health, one out of the community behavioral health s
they have the chance that a good education or when they can learn new skills. they need workers. it is good for our country because of those folks get an education to start a new business. when we support research in medical breakthroughs or nanotechnology, new fields of study. new industries start here and they hire here. [applause] we don't believe government should poke its nose and everything we do. but we do believe this country is stronger at the markets work better when there are rules in place to protect kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution. when there are rules to protect consumers from unscrupulous credit card companies and mortgage lenders. we are convinced that we grow faster and the evidence is on our side. it rewards hard work and companies create jobs in america. we believe that quality health care, for everybody, and retirement, for everybody, they are not just achievable goals, but our values as a nation. that is what we believe. [applause] for eight years, we had a president that actually share those beliefs. his name was bill clinton. you know, the interesting th
. those are two measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be
to educators if something like this comes to their attention. >> some jurors told the judge they taught the defendant had the best of intentions but there was, quote, significant disagreement about whether she took the appropriate action. >> thank you. tonight the woman whose video helped convict ross mirkarimi of domestic violence is ending her long silence. she released a political ad today targeting san francisco supervisor christina alahi. her!&ixg reelection bid, now, te alahi cast one of the votes that kept mirkarimi in office. >> voters need to know what alahi did. i live in district five next door to a convicted batterer who is our sheriff because she thinks it's okay to abuse your wife and run a major law enforcement agency. i'm running for anyone on the ballot but christina alahi. >> the campaign issued a statement saying politicizing thisyid issue is silencing nlrvisors in a way that is dangerous. sheriff mirkarimi says the ads in his words reflects politics of retribution. >> county sheriffs are worried they may not have enough money to run jails. the problem is that state h
that contribute to a stable nation state. as an educator i joined the team to oversee the portfolio of education and was given the opportunity to implement the country's education strategic plan over the southwest provinces. additionally i was given the national action plan for women and control of two female engagement teams which were marines trained to interact with the population of women because of the pashi culture, the males were not allowed to interact with the women. in order obviously to ensure communities stay strong you have to not only address the men, but you absolutely need to address the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is actually just scrolling pictur
. >> you have seen the ads. >> vote for 7. >> politicians claim question 7 money will go to education. >> the battle over the expansion of gambling has become the most expensive campaign in maryland history. more than $70 million has been spent. $35 million by the pennsylvania gaming company which operates casinos in west virginia and northern maryland and $35 million by mgm which wants to open a casino at national harbor. >> there's a lot of money in it. the people who stand to gain quite a bit. >> you have to accompany spending. the money. if their shareholders want them to go ahead. >> they certainly have. compare that to the $11 million total spent on the 2010 maryland gov.'s race. >> this is a stunning amount of cash. >> donald kennel thinks the spending may be clouding the debate. >> the question has to do with how much you think about gambling and how much cash is coming from out of state to shapes the way voters will respond? >> at this early voting center what we heard was even though this spending on the campaign has been historic, their focus has been not on the dollars but
. it is the highest income region. it has people with the highest educational level and the state on average. it tends to be the most democratic region. if you go down to tidewater and hampton roads, that is a heavy defense industry area. it is a white-collar and blue- collar and has a large african- american population. it also has a relatively low nativity rape, people there were not necessarily born in virginia. the navy brings in many people from across the nation and the world. the richmond area as an urban area but it is probably the most conservative urban region in this area. it might be one of the most conservative and the country. it is a traditional area particularly because the west side of richmond -- the east side is heavily african-american and the west side is predominantly white and conservative and has a high negativity rate. some of the counties have become more diverse but by and large, it is also a conservative area. you can include far southwest virginia as a world unto itself. it used to beat republican but mountain valley republican, more liberal republican and now -- and then
later about education, higher education is often the first thing on the menu to cut in many states because young people don't vote in as great a number. that needs to be clearer and more boldly stated by the candidates. >> it's an interesting point. if i'm tutoring at the neighborhood school, i get the instant gratification. if i vote for a candidate, the candidate is a messy sort of things. it also feels to me, ben, part of what that distinction is between charity and justice. charity feels good but justice takes a long time. i hate to do the, oh, young people need to cultivate patience thing, but it does feel a little like that sense. >> look at our culture. we have the high speed internet, fast food. meanwhile you have a gridlocked congress where very little, if not anything is getting done. i think this was the least productive congress ever. >> on purpose. >> reconciling those two forces at odds is difficult for those people. >> we'll come right back to you, valerie and felicia. when we come back, young voters out there, if you're listening, president obama really does have a
are in this for the long run. act has been a leader for performance and education since the first summer in san francisco. our master program in san francisco is rated in the top five in the united states. each year we serve an audience of a quarter million people and act training and education to more than 11,000 students. we provide employment to over 600 people a year. we provide thousands of complementary tickets to the schools and areas of the city and supported by donors and committed trustees lead my nancy living son and mr. roof. when we first met ms. kim we were asked to do outreach. we have met with many leaders of community groups and various leaders. you have those letters of support in our packet. today you will hear several of the supporters and our president, our ark architect, we have speakers and from the tenderloin economic project, one of our students, one of the core acting company and students from the continuation high school. we started a partnership with the downtown school and we are thrilled what we are learning about education working with this dedicated team and their
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
on a long-term bike storage effort as well. prop k explicitly allows funding for safety education and outreach to encourage folks to cycle in the city. listed are a number of annual programs and our transportation fund for clean air revenues support. these are typically lead by the department of environment. one project that is flagged on your hand out for delivery issues is being led by the air district. this is the regional bike share project. i won't cover this. but it's a 12 to 24-month pilot program being done in the south bay select locations on the peninsula to test out bike sharing. i think the air district is experiencing the challenges we face with multiple sponsors. it's not going as fast as we can. we have dug into it a little bit. we are worried about cost controls for staff support cost and can report that the sfmta staff has been diligent in locating space. i think we are well positioned to get our bike sharing part of project out quickly. pedestrian projects, these are ones that we will have locations in each district. we have a larger list that i asked to be deter
16, 201 3:singer the board of education by a vote of six ayes and one absent. wynns approved a contract for one director and the vote of five aye and two absent, mendoza and wynns approved the agreement in the amount of $7525 nthe board of commission by the vote of six aye and one absent, wynns approved the terms of the settlement agreement in the amount of $35,000. in the matter of al verses san francisco unified school district, the vote of 6 ayes and one absent wins, approved the terms of the settlement agreement of the amount of 28,400. ethe board of education by six aye and one absent wins the approve of one intent to dismiss a certified certificate employee two accounts were approved by a vote of six ayes and one absent of wynns and two were approved by a vote of 4 aye and two nays and maufus and murase and two absent. >> item u, no other staff reports tonight. and in adjournment, i would like to adjourn in memory of gloria donahu, retired secretary, and administrative support from school operations. glora passed away on october 14th, after suffering a stroke visiting l
creating the educational links between our school district and kids and parents, to created a decisional open space in private efforts, we have the right team. today, in concert with mayor mathews and mayor reed with people in business, philanthropy, academia coming together, certainly under the very large umbrella of wanting and wishing and making sure this is the most philanthropic event the world's ever seen. it is appropriately hosted in san francisco. i have often heard when something happens in the city they want it to city. when something happens in san francisco, we want the whole world to know about it. this is a stage. super bowl will be a stage we want to announce to the whole world. in that effort i want to make sure you know we don't leave out what i think is happening with great organizations like sf city and our technology companies, that we want to embrace technology as a way to announce this. so with that i am going to do the first tweet. tweeting. the new hash tag we would like everybody in the bay area to also utilize in their effort to go viral on this. there it goes.
in the association and portero hill and dog patch and educated to make the neighborhood a thriving place and located on alameda and if you haven't been there you must go. take my word for it. it's a beautiful space and menu. they utilized local designers and recycled and refurbished to create their modern -- when i say modern it really is and modern and welcome being atmosphere. a special feature is their wonderful patio and garden style with heat lamps and the nights are chilly they have warm kompy blankets for you. they thought of everything. they continue the community commitment and look for sustainable greends and locally produced and glutton free and some deep fried japanese mushrooms. i haven't had that one. but i had the squid seafood spaghetti and it's divine and another favorite is the lavender pan cota for desert. on the review for school there was a couple that summed it up like this. "it was simply divine" and please put your hands together and welcome olia. >> thank you so much supervisor. really kind words. i am honored. i am humbled. i am happy to receive the award among th
predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live is really a tragedy and it's not something that we as americans want to see as an outcome for the next generations and part of the obama's in fact and i have builds on this and the revitalization program and with choice neighborhoods including the planning grants we're announcing here in san francisco we intend to replicate that success across the count ree. as you know today every federal dollar is precious and with choice neighborhoods we have been able to leverage that with other capital and we have grants and including $30 million that was awarded just a little bit ago for the housing development in the bay view, but those $125 million have leveraged additional 1.$6 billion in other funding and that is a ratio or return of 13 to one which is extraordinary as well, so a couple of things , the neighborhood and build the sustainable community of approximately 1600 mixed income units and in the sunny dale neighborhood the corporation will use the grant to have a transformation grant for the neighborhood
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
of their work actually educating tenants on how to prevent from bringing bed bugs into their units. we also fund president mental health association and they actually lead pier groups and support groups for tenants that have issues with hoarding and cluttering, which is actually something that has been shown to lead to the increase of the likelihood of having bed bugs in your units. so that is something that we are currently doing. our tenant advocates are aware of that. one of the best things we can do of course is prevent bed bugs from coming into the units and we will continue to do that work. we're also hoping to more effectively leverage existing city resources around bed bugs. we currently have 16 healthy housing inspectors that we can more adequately leverage to use around education and also in bed bug abatement work. and we have two health inspectors specifically that work with sro buildings through dph. but i think that that feedback is good. we've gotten it from several groups we've worked with including the apartment association and we'll certainly continue that education work. so, th
by core academic courses, provide work force training, provide an education that prepares students for 4 year universities, keep city college libraries and student support services open, keep technology and instructional support up to date, and offset state budget cuts. i'm here with alyssa messer, an english teacher at city college of san francisco. she's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city college is the largest work force training center in san francisco. we train students. we also help students learn english as a second language and then o
social grant, which is about a little under $2,000. they could use it for a child's education. they could use it for building a house-- buying a new house. they could use it for upgrading their land, for fertilizers or they could purchase land with it. what we see on the mashambalogu cpa is a group of people who got together to obtain a farm. for this particular farm, it took 396 people pooling their social grant together to purchase this farm. so it's 396 times 15,000 rands. that white farmer made out like a bandit. narrator: today the cpa representatives meet monthly en ofand. brent joined them during one narrator: today the cpa representatives of his recent research trips. mccusker: and how are you moving forward? well, we've got cattles th... we know that if this cattle wi go rightly. and then we're going to sell it and then we'll go forward. and we are producing some other things to plant a garden-- tomatoes and everything-- so we think those things, also, they are going to help us. to plant(aspeaking- tomatoes locanguageh)ng-- translator: for too long, those who could improve living
education from elementary school up to universities. >>> a man was killed while walking through a muni tunnel in san francisco today. the incident disrupted the muni metro much of the morning. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec is at the montgomery station where service is back to normal. >> reporter: a lot of commuters are thankful because it was a mess this morning. but the investigation into that death continues right now. now muni says he may have actually been hit by two trains. in this dark muni tunnel at the montgomery street station an investigation into a man's death stopped trains on the tracks. it was 7:30 right in the middle of the morning commute. >> uhm, i guess i'm going to walk. >> reporter: thousands of people had to be rerouted. muni was stopping trains at castro and church streets and putting passengers on buses. >> there was a makeshift bus stop with barricades. had to get on a sardine bus and ride downtown. >> buses were very slow coming down market street because of the traffic jam caused by the problem here. >> reporter: trains were stopped for about three hours while p
't real where my passion was. so i went back to school, got my masters in education and never turned back. everything i've done has been related to education, even in the classroom or running a nonprofit organization. i've been in executive management leadership for over 30 years now. first as executive director of a start-up of nonprofit. that became eventually a $10 million organization. and eventually i ran for school board and i have been on the school board for 8 years and currently i'm the president. during the eight years i've been able to provide leadership, build consensus and make tough decisions. and because of that now we have the best urban school district in california. our test scores have gone up every single year since i've been on the school board. and, in fact, last year was the first time we started closing the achievement gap, which is not the easiest thing to do for any school district. i can't tell you this right now because it's in bargain, but we know our test scores as a district and we're going to be showing when it comes out in a week or so that it's going to b
or spillover, to what extent have you noticed after to educate the local human population on how to modify their lifestyle or better to avoid the crossover spillover? >> there's certainly a first in bangladesh trying to educate people not to drink broad date palm sap that could potentially contain the virus. if you cook the stuff, you can kill the virus, but people like to drink it raw. it is sort of a seasonal treat. so there are things like that around the world. in southern china, that cracked down on at least the above ground. there's a black market, but the big wet markets were all kinds of wildlife are sold life for food. there's passion in southern china, they call it wild flavor. it's sort eating wildlife. not because people need protein for subsistence, but because they have money and this is considered to be very robust and tasty food. one other thing on that in terms of education and local people. i mentioned the original spillover of hiv occurred in southeastern cameroon. i went there to retrace it was probably the reader to coming out of south eastern down a river system that
develop its domestic rail infrastructure and matured through training and education and managing that rail system through the creation of a career in transportation. think about growing saudi arabia and talent and not hiring saudi arabians. many are aggressive in seeking out saudi arabian students for some programs. now, as they graduate, we will bring them on for training within the company. with the intent of starting them out in entry-level managers and engineers in the kingdom. they are starting a career. not just being hired on for a job. they did all this. they beat the competition. they won. other american companies are making a significant impact. not just on their businesses, but also on the future of saudi arabia. exxon mobil has a long tradition in the kingdom. among their success is a huge refinery about two hours north of a main city. the refinery has 92% saudi arabian employees. stretching all the way from management to blue-collar employees. exxon mobil was into saudia station before saudia station was required. we anticipate this to the same degree of the new refinery that
smart guy. he is highly educated and very different from a lot of other latino politicians. he is completely american in his point of view. i think it will pass over more than a lot of other candidates. >> give me your sense of how important beyond this election this voting bloc will become. >> just democracy itself, that means the percentage of overall vote and will be hispanic will continue to grow. how will it break? i do not think it is a democrat did block. i think it is an independent bloc. i think it is winnable for both parties. i do not think immigration we will be talking about in five or 10 years. i think the party that ignores some of these basic issues, education reform is really a major civil rights issue right now. 80% of the students in los angeles public schools are hispanic, so when that system sales, los angeles fails, california fails, but latinos feel this as well. tavis: how important is it to have voices in mainstream media that get a chance to express this view? >> one would be nice. i am struggling. when you look at the sunday morning shows, they are fa
back now. here's my plan for the next four years: making education and training a national priority; building on our manufacturing boom; boosting american-made energy; reducing the deficits responsibly by cutting where... we can, and asking the wealthy to pay a little more. and ending the war in afghanistan, so we can... do some nation-building here at home. that's the right path. so read my plan, compare it to governor romney's... and decide which is better for you. it's an honor to be your president... and i'm asking for your vote... so together, we can keep moving america forward. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >> the heaviest rains are now and will be with us through midnight. wjla.com will give you more information until we come back on the air. >> we will return at 7:00 with more hurricane coverage. teacher: this is west virginia, pennsylvania, delaware. and this is maryland. every year marylanders spend five hundred and fifty million gaming at casinos in these other states. question seven will build a new casino and bring table games to baltimore... generating h
. nobody else can do this to the extent we can. we have very sharp people, well-educated, well schooled and trained particularly in the medical profession's to make a difference on things. and we have this ongoing research and development as background to make us all better at doing these things. so, these are the basics, and one of the things we would like to draw out today is what else is there that we should understand, what else can we do, how can we take these attributes and capabilities and maybe make them better? i won't want to monopolize all the time, but i would like to throw my desire on the table, and that is it's been a great honor, and i have to admit an eye opener at first to go around the world to places that are certainly less privileged than we are and to see the dedicated efforts of so many people not just from this country but many other countries who are trying to make a difference in places that need help with is a medical area or general health and welfare of people advancing their education, let in this venue the fundamental security, personal security through be
to not necessarily covering beats but covering narrative's. rather than just putting one person on education to try to double that entire fire house that comes at him, -- fire hose that comes at them, they can add narratives and subtract them, make sure people are involved. if they are not enrolled in those neighbor -- narratives, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still -- fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north
journalism at the edward r. mural school of education because it gave me an opportunity to engage in the issues shaping my community. i took that sense of purpose, and i worked at the office of united states senator cantwell, i worked on her immigration services staff but more importantly i worked on her staff advocating for those democratic values, those values of truth, honesty, inclusion and tolerance. i took that sense of purpose and i went to school at hastings college of law. there i served as vice president of one of the largest law schools, largest public law schools in the country. i took that sense of purpose, and i applied to the san francisco courts indegint panel and there i work on behalf excuse the expression, dirt poor residents who cannot afford an attorney of their own. but i did not stop there. i took that sense of purpose, and i founded the radio and television program that originate, on ksfs called folk law to give voice to the issues facing san francisco now these are not the issues that make the 10:00 o'clock news, these are the issues like parking, these ar
. uninterrupted. and on digital 4.2. is just one of two related to education that is going to be on the ballot. dan kerman has the details of these two initiatives. about four or students, the california future. vote " yes ". , proposition 38 will bring a lot of money to or schools. >> proposition 385 billion of dollars on the education st. >> if you listen to this it is to listen there are conflicting in similar assertions creating confusion. >> there is more many in education. the patrick murphy says that there are distinct differences. proposition 30 is backed by the governor in teachers' union calls for one quarter sales tax for four years. and it will raise the income tax for people earning $250,000 per year or more for seven years. this is the brainchild and backed by the pta would raise the income tax on most people in california for 12 years. it is one distinct difference. but the top one percent would pay for 78% of the revenue. the top one percent would pay for 44 percent of the revenue. >> there is also a difference on where the money goes. at least this year it would go into the ge
that judgment and now you have to work with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain differen
of his life today. and he has done more than just about anybody else to educate me about issues in and around mental health. he's opened my eyes, opened my ears to a lot of issues that prior to coming to the board i had no idea about. and i'm very grateful to fred for doing that. and just within quite frankly the very parochial world of district 7, i give great credit to fred for making this issue far more prevalent in the minds of the residents of district 7, helping everybody understand maybe to get back to present truth comments about it takes a village, fred is definitely a very strong advocate on these issues and brings out the message to a lot of people who need to hear that message. and i'm very grateful to you, fred, for all that you've done for me, educating me about the issue, educating the residents of district 7. and separate and apart from mental health, thank you for all that you've done for me on many other issues, all that you've done for district 7 and all that you've done for san francisco over the course of your lifetime, your dedication to all of us is someth
in addition to helping out the residents in the district because we're trying to educate them, too, as far as what is going on out there in relation to homeless and the mental health. thank you again. [cheering and applauding] (applause) >> thank you, and congratulations. i want to take a moment to acknowledge our representative from mayor lee's office, bevan dufty who helps coordinate many of our mental health programs here in the city. he has a couple honorees who have to leave in a couple moments so i wanted to give him a moment to do the presentations. >> thank you, mr. president, members of the board. if i could ask [speaker not understood] to come up? [cheering and applauding] >> and i'd like to welcome jason's son to come up, if he'd come up and join us. i've never met him and i hear a lot about him. i've never seen jason in a tie, so, this is a pretty exciting day for me. come on, buddy. on behalf of mayor lee, first let me acknowledge supervisor cohen for partnering with the mental health board to create this event and for all of you for participating and i certainly hope this bec
[ú it is the most important job of your supervisor. since@-átu i am an educator, i h at city college of san francisco, it is the nature of an educator to bring outxyx best quality in people, if one asks me, what would you do first, should you getgg i'd say working closely with different(7uv city departments, members of the community fate of central subway, which is most=a controversial rightsst . more over, we take for granted that district 3, one of generators of this city. it'su tourism. i just can't thinkp neighborhood so easily accessible to other areas of interest to visitors of ourÑe beautiful city. fisherman's wharf, -- square. unfortunately the construction of central subway may impact the survival of merchants within this fragile corridor. when comes to@0f 6, for her sincerity and dedication to make life better for district 3,"Ñ and for this t beautiful city by the bay. thank you.4 xie xie >c >> hello ladies and gentlemen of district five my name is london ried and i am asking for your vote for the district of supervisors. >> i grew up on the same street that all live on, ride
richard. he writes. i have created a series of educational dvds. i would like to start a business that among other things would sell these educational dvds to schools as part of their lesson plants and to retail outlet's in box sets. how do i determine a value weighs when looking for investors which i would need to produce investors? >> old school. i think the reality is that investors, there is going to be something in between what an entrepreneur thinks that their valuation is and what an investor thinks. a lot of accelerators are saying, for $25,000, we are going to take 10% of your company, regardless if you are selling educational dvds or anything. that's sort of setting what i think is sort of the right level on the floor. >> what about this idea of convertible debt? it sounds like for what he is doing, maybe this is for friends or family or somebody who is interested in the educational world. the idea of don't set the valuation at this first round. say this is debt. when we get our next round and we have more sophisticated investors, with he will convert that into equity. d
old and is a pet owner may lean democrat and be susceptible to ads about education issues. thanks to these algorithms, the campaigns can categorize voters into like-minded groups and tailor their advertising directly to them. >> what this now shows is when you've done a select of voters in a particular jurisdiction, it will map out where those voters live. >> reporter: which means once the campaigns have used algorithms to decide which voters to target, they lose i have been pet-owning, wash d.c. d.c. nascar fans who care about national security, for instance, the software can lead them right to their front door. >> so a campaign can literally know who on a block-by-block basis is persuadable and only target those people. >> that's correct. reporter: but what makes this year's presidential election different is that political advertisers now have unprecedented access to your on-line browsing data and can deliver tailored ads to you online. >> so the idea here with online is that you can target people very precisely based upon their interests and based upon th the behavior. when yo
Search Results 81 to 180 of about 1,372 (some duplicates have been removed)